peneplain

tentaklingon's inspiration blog

lady:

Freedom | Anthony Hamilton & Elayna Boynton

(via homovikings)

— 4 weeks ago with 710 notes
glencairnmuseum:

Anubis, the god of the dead and embalming, is represented as a jackal-like animal. Here he is depicted on a linen shroud, which would have completely enveloped a mummified body. (Late Ptolemaic Period or Roman Period; in Glencairn’s Ancient Egypt Gallery.)

glencairnmuseum:

Anubis, the god of the dead and embalming, is represented as a jackal-like animal. Here he is depicted on a linen shroud, which would have completely enveloped a mummified body. (Late Ptolemaic Period or Roman Period; in Glencairn’s Ancient Egypt Gallery.)

(via ancientart)

— 1 month ago with 1830 notes

calantheandthenightingale:

Half-mourning dress (1889 - 1892) by Sara Mayer & A. Morhange, Victoria and Albert Museum

This particular dress has ended up on my blog quite a few times; I just can’t help but reblog it whenever it shows up on my dash— it’s perfect.  This really is one of my favorite dresses.

(via cenobitesquid)

— 1 month ago with 226 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Costume designed by Florica Malureanu for June Anderson in the 1985 production of Giacomo Meyerbeer’s Robert le diable

From the Centre National du Costume de Scene

(via cenobitesquid)

— 1 month ago with 451 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Costume designed by Jean-Pierre Ponnelle for Christiane Castelli in the 1958 production of Andre Messager’s Isoline

From the Centre National du Costume de Scene

(via cenobitesquid)

— 1 month ago with 873 notes

pansy-von-doom:

virtual-artifacts:

Poland, 19th C. Egg decorated with micrographic text from the Song of Songs. Handwritten in ink. From the 18th century, and perhaps even earlier, hollow eggs on which sacred texts had been written in micrography were used to decorate European sukkahs. Not all the texts related directly to the holiday of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths: this example has Song of Songs 1-4:7 inscribed in minuscule letters. At times feathers were added to the hanging egg, so that it looked like a bird in flight.”

Apparently, this art form developed from Jews having to put long pages of text on to small objects that they could easily conceal and carry with them, in countries where Judaism was illegal.

Incredibly beautiful objects, too! 

What a find! 

(via oz-lion)

— 1 month ago with 1740 notes

vaganovaboy:

Semyon Chudin as Prince Desiré

The Sleeping Beauty

Bolshoi Theatre

(via kuklarusskaya)

— 1 month ago with 200 notes
dopeboyanx asked: Why is it so difficult for people to believe that there were POC in Europe throughout all of history? It seems to me that there had to be Africans in Europe before white people even existed. Am I wrong about that?


Answer:

medievalpoc:

As for the first question, we had a discussion a little while ago kind of brainstorming on what purposes that belief serves/how in functions in society.

As for the second one, the science people recently moved up the date for light-skinned genes evolving/occurring for the first time in humanity’s history. Turns out it was actually a relatively recent development:

Many scientists have believed that lighter skin gradually arose in Europeans starting around 40,000 years ago, soon after people left tropical Africa for Europe’s higher latitudes. The hunter-gatherer’s dark skin pushes this date forward to only 7,000 years ago, suggesting that at least some humans lived considerably longer than thought in Europe before losing the dark pigmentation that evolved under Africa’s sun.

"It was assumed that the lighter skin was something needed in high latitudes, to synthesize vitamin D in places where UV light is lower than in the tropics," Lalueza-Fox told LiveScience.

Scientists had assumed this was true because people need vitamin D for healthy bones, and can synthesize it in the skin with energy from the sun’s UV rays, but darker skin, like that of the hunter-gatherer man, prevents UV-ray absorption.

But the new discovery shows that latitude alone didn’t drive the evolution of Europeans’ light skin. If it had, light skin would have become widespread in Europeans millennia earlier, Lalueza-Fox said.

The new analysis of that DNA now shows the man had the gene mutation for blue eyes, but not the European mutations for lighter skin.

The DNA also shows that the man was more closely related to modern-day northern Europeans than to southern Europeans.

Apparently the science people are flailing around about it. To be fair, it’s a pretty significant change.

— 1 month ago with 830 notes

surrenda:

iPhone 5 photos of some of the things I ate in Japan. 

(via undeadseanbean)

— 1 month ago with 28393 notes